The Pizza School of Business Management

//The Pizza School of Business Management

The Pizza School of Business Management

Any boss who’s ever needed people to work late knows that pizza can be a powerful incentive. The question has never been whether or not people love to chow down on a cheesy slice, but what they’ll do, and how far they’re willing to go, to get one.

David Ariely, a researcher and author of the bestselling Payoff: The Hidden Logic That Shapes Our Motivations, decided to see just how powerful a motivator free pizza could be. It will come as no surprise to pizza lovers everywhere that, when compared to other rewards, such as compliments from the boss, or even small amounts of bonus money, the promise of free pizza was the most effective way to increase the output of workers in an Israeli microchip factory.

Offering pizza to the workers increased their productivity by an impressive 6.7 percent on the very first day of the test. Cash, on the other hand, actually led to a drop in productivity over the course of the week-long experiment.

Ariely argues that the gains in productivity would have been even higher if, instead of giving the pizza directly to the workers, the company had had it delivered to their homes, where they could share it with their friends and families.

The lesson in all this? The next time you really need someone to do something for you, an extra-large all-dressed and a smile will go a lot further than a handful of filthy lucre!

Any boss who’s ever needed people to work late knows that pizza can be a powerful incentive. The question has never been whether or not people love to chow down on a cheesy slice, but what they’ll do, and how far they’re willing to go, to get one.

David Ariely, a researcher and author of the bestselling Payoff: The Hidden Logic That Shapes Our Motivations, decided to see just how powerful a motivator free pizza could be. It will come as no surprise to pizza lovers everywhere that, when compared to other rewards, such as compliments from the boss, or even small amounts of bonus money, the promise of free pizza was the most effective way to increase the output of workers in an Israeli microchip factory.

Offering pizza to the workers increased their productivity by an impressive 6.7 percent on the very first day of the test. Cash, on the other hand, actually led to a drop in productivity over the course of the week-long experiment.

Ariely argues that the gains in productivity would have been even higher if, instead of giving the pizza directly to the workers, the company had had it delivered to their homes, where they could share it with their friends and families.

The lesson in all this? The next time you really need someone to do something for you, an extra-large all-dressed and a smile will go a lot further than a handful of filthy lucre!

 

Writer: Robbie Dillon

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2017-09-20T15:12:11+00:00September 20th, 2017|